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Fevers

What is a fever?

A fever is a temperature of 100.4º F and higher.

The body has several ways to maintain normal body temperature. The organs involved in helping with temperature regulation include the brain, skin, muscle, and blood vessels. The body responds to changes in temperature by:

When your child has a fever, the body works the same way to control the temperature, but it resets its thermostat at a higher temperature. The temperature increases for a number of reasons:

What conditions can cause a fever?

The following conditions can cause a fever:

What are the benefits of a fever?

A fever actually helps the body destroy its microbial invader. It also stimulates an inflammatory response, which sends all kinds of substances to the area of infection to protect the area, prevent the spread of the invader, and start the healing process.

What are the symptoms that my child may have a fever?

Children with fevers may become more uncomfortable as the temperature rises. The following are the most common symptoms of a fever. However, each child may experience symptoms differently. In addition to body temperature greater than 100.4º F, symptoms may include:

The symptoms of a fever may resemble other medical conditions. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, if your child is younger than two months of age and has a rectal temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, you should call your pediatrician. If you are unsure, always consult your child's physician for a diagnosis.

When should a fever be treated?

In children, a fever that is equal to or greater than 102.2° F should be treated. Children older than two months of age with a fever of 102° or higher that does not respond to fever-reducing medication should be seen by a physician. Children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years can develop seizures from a high fever (called febrile seizures). If your child does have a febrile seizure, there is a chance that the seizure may occur again, but, usually, children outgrow the febrile seizures. A febrile seizure does not mean your child has epilepsy.

If your child is very uncomfortable with a lower fever, treatment may be necessary. Treating your child's fever will not help the body get rid of the infection any quicker, it simply will relieve discomfort associated with fever.

What can I do to decrease my child's fever?

Specific treatment for a fever will be determined by your physician based on:

Administer an anti-fever medication, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. DO NOT give your child aspirin, as it has been linked to a serious, potentially fatal disease, called Reye syndrome.

Other ways to reduce a fever:

When should I call my child's physician?

When a child’s temperature reaches 105°, this is considered a medical emergency and the child needs immediate medical attention, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Call your child's physician immediately if your child is younger than 2 months old and any of the followings conditions are present:

Call your child's physician within 24 hours if your child is 2 to 4 months old and any of the following conditions are present:

Call your child's physician during office hours if any of the following conditions are present:

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