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The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Vaccine Education Center Parents PACK Newsletter

September 2012

Trivia Corner: United States President Affected by Polio

What U.S. president is known for having had polio? 
Find out»

Feature Article: Fighting Polio in Pakistan

Polio is a vaccine-preventable disease caused by a virus that spreads when food or water is contaminated with feces. Polio causes a wide range of symptoms, but 90 of 100 people typically experience no symptoms. Because this group is still contagious, they unknowingly spread the virus. Mild symptoms typically occur in 6 of 100 people infected with polio virus and are similar to those of other viral infections (e.g., sore throat, fever and nausea). Severe symptoms are less common, affecting about 1 of 100 people, and can include muscle aches, spasms and paralysis.

Read more about the polio vaccine, its inventor, and polio vaccination in Pakistan»  

Spotlight: Top 10 Airports Contributing to the Spread of Infectious Diseases

Have you ever thought about the spread of disease while sitting in an airport?

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) recently developed a computer model using real world travel patterns to determine which airports were most likely to contribute to the spread of infectious diseases.

According to the model, JFK International Airport in New York and Los Angeles International Airport in California are the top two airports most likely to contribute to the spread of infectious diseases. Because Honolulu International Airport in Hawaii is a common layover location for U.S.-Asia flights, it was third on the list.

View MIT’s video to learn more about how travel through airports can contribute to the spread of infectious diseases»
 

Did You Know? REAL SIMPLE Magazine Publishes Article About Vaccines

Did you know that REAL SIMPLE magazine recently published an article about vaccines? The article, titled 15 Things You Need to Know About Vaccines, was written by Kate Rope and published in the July 2012 issue. Experts answered a variety of questions regarding vaccines and vaccine safety, including “Do vaccines cause side effects?”, “What is thimerosal and is it dangerous?”, and “Do I need to worry about ‘vaccine overload’?”

If you didn’t see the REAL SIMPLE article, check it out now»

Ask the VEC: Chickenpox Vaccine Catch-up

Q. My 3-year-old daughter never received the first dose of the chickenpox vaccine because the country we lived in when she was an infant did not offer it. Soon we are planning to move back to that country, is it necessary for her to get the chickenpox vaccine before we go?

A. The current recommendation in the U.S. for children who did not receive their first dose of chickenpox vaccine by 15 months is to get it as soon as is feasible, and then receive the second dose at 4-6 years of age. However, because you mention that you plan to leave the U.S. soon, it is possible for her to get the second dose of the chickenpox vaccine 3 months after getting the first dose.

If the chickenpox vaccine isn’t used in the country to which you are returning, there is likely to be a higher rate of disease than you see in the U.S. So, getting your daughter vaccinated before you move back will help protect her from getting chickenpox.

Read more about chickenpox and the chickenpox vaccine»

Around the World: Absolute Return for Kids

Absolute Return for Kids (ARK) is one of the United Kingdom’s (U.K.) fastest growing fundraising charities. ARK focuses its work in the areas of education, health and child protection for disadvantaged children all over the world, and has been instrumental in distributing the rotavirus vaccine to vulnerable populations.

Education
ARK operates public schools in the U.K. and developing world, making sure these children have access to an education no matter their background or poverty level. To date, ARK’s education programs have helped 40,000 children in the United States, U.K. and India.

Health
ARK’s health programs have already helped 200,000 children in sub-Saharan Africa by providing access to HIV/AIDS treatment, improving maternal health and combatting diarrhea through its efforts to distribute the rotavirus vaccine.

Child Protection
ARK partnered with Hope and Homes for Children in an attempt to end institutional child care in Romania. They hope their efforts in Romania will serve as a model for completing this task in other parts of Eastern Europe. Currently, ARK has child protection programs in Romania and Bulgaria, which have helped more than 9,000 children.

Learn more about Absolute Return for Kids»

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ABOUT THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL OF PHILADELPHIA®
Founded in 1855, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia is the birthplace of pediatric medicine in America. Throughout its history, a passionate spirit of innovation has driven this renowned institution to pursue scientific discovery, establish the highest standards of patient care, train future leaders in pediatrics, and advocate for children’s health. A haven of hope for children and families worldwide, CHOP is a nonprofit charitable organization that relies on the generous support of its donors to continue to set the global standard for pediatric care.

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