Concussion Knowledge for School Staff | The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Concussion Care for Kids: Minds Matter

Concussion Knowledge for School Staff

This section is written for school-based professionals (administrators, guidance counselors, nurses, school psychologists, school resource officers and teachers).

We share a common goal: to return a student with students and teachers in classrooma concussion back to the classroom as safely and as quickly as possible.

A child’s primary “job” or responsibility is to attend school and learn. Unfortunately, academic challenges are common after a student sustains a concussion. Although not every concussed child plays sports, every child is a student and the initial focus should be a return to school before return to sports.

Read about state laws governing “return to play" for students with concussion.

Video FAQs about school re-entry after a concussion

VIDEO APPEARS HERE

Increase your concussion knowledge

Concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury, induced by biomechanical forces, caused by a blow or jolt to the head or body. It temporarily disrupts the normal functioning of the brain. Concussion is not a structural injury, so standard radiological tests are often normal. Read more about concussion.

Most people recover completely from a concussion in days or weeks, but symptoms can last much longer. Over-exertion, re-injury and academic or emotional stress can aggravate symptoms and prolong recovery. Allowing the student to re-enter academics in a graded and monitored fashion is ideal in minimizing these stressors. A student who has co-morbidities prior to his or her concussion, such as learning disorders or migraine headaches, often has a slower recovery period.

At The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, we use a five-step process called “Return to Learn” to manage a concussed student’s return to school.

Information in this section is broken down by a child’s needs from the school generally, in the classroom specifically, and by his or her developmental stage. We suggest that you skim all sections and then return to the ones that will help your student’s particular case.

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If you suspect a concussion

Contact your child’s primary care doctor for evaluation.

Find a CHOP Primary Care physician near you »

If symptoms persist, you can schedule an appointment with
a concussion specialist:

Sports Medicine and Performance Center
215-590-1527

Pediatric Trauma Center
215-590-5932

Helping Your Child Recover After a Concussion

Download our Return to Learn and Return to Play Plans»