Infectious Diseases

Pediatric Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program

Overview and mission
Specific information by years and/or rotation
General information on outcomes of fellows
Clinical and research activities
Additional information about the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program

Overview and mission

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Training Program is a three-year program designed to prepare pediatricians for a career in academic pediatric infectious diseases. The first year is dedicated to clinical training. The second and third years are focused upon research training in either the clinical or basic sciences.

Fellowship training program director

Jason Kim, MD, MSCE
Division of Infectious Diseases
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard
Philadelphia, PA 19104-4399
267-426-7444
Email Dr. Kim

Division chief

Paul A. Offit, MD
Division of Infectious Diseases
Leonard and Madlyn Abramson Pediatric Research Center
Room 1202
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
3561 Civic Center Boulevard
Philadelphia, PA 19104-4399
215-590-2020
Email Dr. Offit

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Specific information by years and/or rotation

Clinical training

The first year of training is designed to provide the fellow with an intensive experience seeing inpatients and outpatients in consultation with an attending physician. The clinical service typically evaluates 15 to 25 new patients each week. To complement this experience, the first year fellow also rotates through the clinical microbiology and virology laboratories, the infection control service and the immunology and HIV clinics.

Research training

During the first year, the fellowship director and division chief will help the fellow select a research mentor in either the basic or clinical sciences. Appropriate mentors may be selected from any school within the University of Pennsylvania or the Wistar Institute. The second and third year should provide the fellow with the opportunity to pursue a focused research project. During this time, the fellow is expected to gain experience designing and conducting hypothesis-driven research. Ideally, a fellowship research project should culminate in the submission of a manuscript to a peer-reviewed journal.

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General information on outcomes of fellows

Over the past 10 years, 13 individuals have entered and completed the training program in Pediatric Infectious Diseases. As of 2002, nine of these graduates are in academic positions and three are working in industry. During this time period, six fellows have received federal funding (NIH K award series) to continue their research activities beyond the period of fellowship training.

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Clinical and research resources

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Additional information about the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program

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