Orthopedic Surgery

Preventing Surgical Site Infections

Surgical site infections are a very real issue in the United States. Two to 5 percent of patients undergoing inpatient surgery in the U.S. will experience a surgical site infection (SSI), leading to more days in the hospital, increased healthcare costs, and an increased risk of serious health complications.

Here’s a brief overview of what we do at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to decrease the chance your child will experience a surgical site infection.

Preoperative

Before surgery, we are concerned with skin colonization — that is — any germs that may be on or in your child’s body before he or she is taken to the operating room (OR).

Safety techniques we employ include:

Intraoperative

During surgery, we are concerned with a number of factors: skin colonization, the OR environment and your child’s physiology.

Safety techniques we employ include:

For detailed information about safety in the operating room, see CHOP's surgical safety checklist

Post operative

After surgery, we are concerned with your child’s physiology and wound care.

Safety techniques we employ include:

More information

If you have specific questions about your child's surgery, please talk to your child's clinical team. They will be able to address any concerns you have. 

 

Reviewed by: Keith D. Baldwin, MD, MPH, MSPT, and John P. Dormans, MD, FACS 
Date: May 2013

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