Vaccine Schedule – Timetable

The following list provides a suggested timetable. Although vaccine schedules can differ slightly, you can generally expect the following vaccines at the ages indicated below.

Infant to 2 years old

Print a downloadable version of the vaccine timetable for children from birth through 2 years old:

Hepatitis B

First dose: at birth

Second dose: 1 to 2 months

Third dose: 6 to 18 months

Rotavirus

First dose: 2 months

Second dose: 4 months

Third dose: 6 months. Depending on the type of rotavirus vaccine used, the third dose may be omitted.

Diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis (DTaP)

First dose: 2 months

Second dose: 4 months

Third dose: 6 months

Fourth dose: 15-18 months

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

First dose: 2 months

Second dose: 4 months

Third dose: 6 months

Fourth dose: 12-15 months

Pneumococcal

First dose: 2 months

Second dose: 4 months

Third dose: 6 months

Fourth dose: 12-15 months

Polio

First dose: 2 months

Second dose: 4 months

Third dose: 6 to 18 months

Influenza

Two doses one month apart, then one dose every year starting at 6 months of age

Measles/mumps/rubella (MMR)

First dose: 12-15 months

Varicella (chickenpox)

First dose: 12-15 months

Hepatitis A

Two doses six months apart: 12-23 months

4 to 6 years of age

Diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis (DTaP)

One booster dose: 4-6 years

Polio

One booster dose: 4-6 years

Measles/mumps/rubella (MMR)

One booster dose: 4-6 years

Varicella (chickenpox)

One booster dose: 4-6 years

11 to 18 years of age

Tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis (Tdap)

One dose: 11-12 years

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

First dose: 11-12 years

Second dose:  6-12 months after first dose

Note: Teens starting this vaccine at 15 years or older need three doses. The second dose should be given one to two months after the first dose, and the third dose should be given six to 12 months after the first dose.

Meningococcal (ACWY)

First dose: 11-12 years

Second dose: 16-18 years

Note: Teens 16 to 18 years old and those starting college who did not have this vaccine previously should get one dose.

Meningococcal (B)

First dose: 16-18 years

Second dose: one month or six months after dose #1, depending on version of vaccine used

Note: In some situations, such as in outbreak scenarios and for immune-compromised teens, three doses will be recommended with the second dose administered one to two months after the first dose, and the third dose six months after the first dose. Talk to your child’s doctor if you have questions about the number of doses your child will need.

Reference

CDC Schedule information

Reviewed by Paul A. Offit, MD on November 15, 2016

Materials in this section are updated as new information and vaccines become available. The Vaccine Education Center staff regularly reviews materials for accuracy.

You should not consider the information in this site to be specific, professional medical advice for your personal health or for your family's personal health. You should not use it to replace any relationship with a physician or other qualified healthcare professional. For medical concerns, including decisions about vaccinations, medications and other treatments, you should always consult your physician or, in serious cases, seek immediate assistance from emergency personnel.