Executive Function Interventions

These executive function interventions are rooted in research and aim to create new habits that can sidestep or override a child’s cognitive challenges. When something becomes a habit, your child doesn’t have to think about it and can use his brainpower for new things.

The target is not just the executive functions — it's also the external environment. In very precise ways, these interventions put more supports into the system so your child can function as their best self. That might mean adjusting the environment, and people’s responses, so that your child develops competency through experiences of success.

These executive function interventions can vastly improve a family’s quality of life by neutralizing stress and frustration. With help, your child can function more effectively at home, in school, in relationships, and in the community.

In what ways does your child struggle with schoolwork?

Child

Sitting Still for Homework

Create a distraction-free homework zone for your child by gathering all her supplies in one place.

Turning in Homework

Your best defense against chronic homework issues may be teaching your child how to use a daily planner to stay organized and on target.

Leaving School Without Packing Backpack

Children who are consistently quick to grab and go, without filling their backpacks with homework supplies may need some help with their inhibition skills.

Adolescent

Talking Too Much in Group Study

Replacement behaviors can help children who interrupt too much or dominate conversations learn to override their urge to talk.

Poor Notes, Stressed Studying

If your child processes information slowly and struggles with note taking, get the extra support he needs to absorb the information at his own pace.

Completing Long-Term Assignments

The key to successfully completing long-term tasks is flexible planning and problem solving. Use our tips to help your child build skills that will turn the next overwhelming assignment into a manageable one.

Starting Homework

The best tool to help your procrastinating child get started on a task can be found in your kitchen — an old fashioned kitchen timer.

Zoning Out in Class

Your child's teacher can be her best ally in keeping her focused when she zones out in class.

In what ways does your child struggle at home?

Child

Getting Ready in the Morning

Trade chaos for competence in your child's morning routine with visual prompts to help her build her organizational skills.

Following Instructions to Perform a Chore

Your child may tune out your chore instructions because the thought of doing chores doesn't thrill him, or he may just be slow in processing information that contains multiple steps.

Doing What You Ask, When You Ask

Constantly repeating yourself when giving your child a directive? Hold his attention by getting verbal confirmation that he has heard what you said.

Avoiding Distraction on an Outing

It can be difficult for some children to resist the urge to wander off in search of something more exciting, but they can be taught to steer their choices.

Losing Track of Belongings

Using a visual cue can be a handy reminder for your child to put things in their proper place while also sharpening organizational skills.

Remembering Multiple-Step Instructions

A mnemonic can be a handy tool to help your child remember multiple-step instructions.

Crying Over Little Things

When every small issue becomes a big deal to your child and leads to tears, validating her disappointment without giving in will help her learn emotional control.

Accepting Alternative Options

Help your child learn to deal with situations that don't go her way by practicing the "either-or" technique to lessen anxiety and build flexibility.

Adolescent

Lost Shoes and Missing Backpack

Using a visual cue can be a handy reminder for your child to put things in their proper place while also sharpening her organizational skills.

Remembering Multiple-Step Instructions

A mnemonic can be a handy tool to help your child remember multiple-step instructions.

Fighting with a Friend

When your child loses his cool, he can avert the urge to fight with a friend if he takes a pause to acknowledge his feelings and wait for them to pass.

Being a Good Judge of His Own Performance

When your child's perception of her behavior is very different from yours, you can compare notes using a three-column reality check exercise.

Always Running Late

How reliable is your teen's internal clock? Knowing how long it takes to do various task by using a stopwatch will help your teen to better manage her time.

Imagining Worst Possible Outcomes of Small Setbacks

If your child sees small changes in plans as big catastrophes, you can help him adjust his perspective by giving an imaginary pep talk to a friend dealing with a similar situation.

What to Expect

You and your child or adolescent will meet with a pediatric neuropsychologist for approximately one hour. 

Executive Function Interventions

These interventions aim to create new habits that can sidestep or override a child’s cognitive challenges.