Clinical Research Finder

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia leads or participates in hundreds of clinical trials. Use this database to learn the purpose of these trials, find out who can participate and more.

Find a Clinical Research Study

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Multiparametric MRI of kidney tranplant

In this study, we are developing new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods to determine if it is effective in diagnosing complication in kidney transplant patients.Participants in this study will involve patients that have had a kidney transplant and are scheduled for a kidney biopsy. The study will also involve a comparison group of healthy individuals that have no history of kidney conditions. Study procedures will include a review of medical history and medications, MRI scan of the abdomen and blood/ urine test.

T2017-002 TACL Ixazomib study

CHOP and the Therapeutic Advances in Childhood Leukemia & Lymphoma (TACL) consortium is conducting a study for children and young adults 21 years old or younger who have relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or lymphoblastic lymphoma. This study adds the study drug 'Ixazomib' to standard relapsed ALL chemotherapy drugs. For more information about this study, including specific eligibility criteria, please visit clinicaltrials.gov and search for "NCT03817320" or visit the TACL website at https://tacl.chla.usc.edu/Tacl/#!/Page/3. To hear more about this and other available trails or get any questions answered please contact our Cancer Intake Specialist by phone at 267-426-0762 or email Oncointake@email.chop.edu.

Food Allergy Anxiety

The goal of this study is to identify and measure anxiety symptoms in children and adolescents with food allergy. We are looking for families of children with IgE-mediated food allergies between 8 and 18 years of age to participate. The study procedures involve both the caregiver and child filling out online questionnaires on two separate occasions.

ARPKD/HRFD Database

'CHOP is partnering with Children's National Medical Center (CNMC) to create a research database of data and blood samples of people who have autosomal polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) or another hepato/renal fibrocystic disease (HRFD). The purpose is to try to learn more about the causes of these diseases. If you are interested in participating, we will collect data from your medical record to contribute to the database at CNMC. You may also provide an optional blood sample. You may visit arpkdb.org and download the FAQs for you and your child’s doctor or call the CHOP Research Coordinator, Mohini Dutt, at 267-425-3933.

Ertugliflozin for children and adolescents with Type 2 Diabetes

You are invited to take part in a voluntary research trial because you have type 2 diabetes and are between the ages of 10 and 17 years. You will be given a placebo or Ertugliflozin, which has been approved in the United States by the FDA for treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults but not in children. If you meet all criteria, you will be asked to come to CHOP for 8 study visits and have 4 phone calls for a total of approximately 60 weeks. Besides oral administration of the study product (a pill taken daily), the study procedures include: review of medical records, physical exam, EKG, blood and urine tests, renal ultrasounds, nutritional and physical activity counseling, and diary completion. You will be compensated for your time and effort committed to the study and reimbursed for your travel expenses.

Panzyga Study

Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a blood disorder in which the immune system produces antibodies that attack and destroy body's own blood platelets. The Panzyga Study is looking at a potential medicine (experimental drug) to see if it can result in increasing platelet counts and may potentially treat ITP. You will be infused with the experimental drug once or twice during the treatment period and will be followed up for 32 days. Testing will include blood tests, urine tests, pregnancy tests and physical exams. You may be able to take part in the study if you: • are =1 year to <18 years old. • have been diagnosed with chronic ITP.

Pediatric KIDney Stone (PKIDS) Care Improvement Network

Kidney stones are one of the fastest growing health conditions among children, adolescents, and young adults. The rapid increase over a short period of time has resulted in a large number of pediatric patients who require surgery to remove kidney stones with very little information available to guide selection of treatment options. There are three alternative approaches to remove kidney stones: ureteroscopy (an endoscopic outpatient procedure), shockwave lithotripsy (a noninvasive outpatient procedure), or percutaneous nephrolithotomy (a minimally invasive surgery with a short hospital stay). This study will compare stone clearance (a primary determinant of painful stone passage, Emergency Department visits, and surgical retreatment) and patients’ experiences after ureteroscopy, shockwave lithotripsy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy for patients 8 to 21 years of age. The findings from this study will provide information that helps pediatric patients and their caregivers make individualized decisions on selecting the most appropriate surgical treatment option.

Disease Flare in sJIA

In patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), it is often difficult for physicians to distinguish between infection and inflammatory disease activity. The purpose of this study is to see if two biomarkers, called CP and PCT, can help physicians identify when patients have an infection versus a flare of their sJIA. This study involves two study visits, one at the time of a sJIA flare and one approximately 60 days after. We will ask participants to provide 3 teaspoons of blood for laboratory assessments, as well as answer brief questionnaires about their disease. The researchers will also review each participant's medical records for information regarding the history of their disease.

Trial of Erenumab in Children and Teens with Migraine less than 15 days per month

This study is a trial comparing the effects of erenumab to placebo in children ages 6-17 years old with migraine less than 15 days per month. Eligible participants will be given either erenumab or placebo, assigned randomly (like the flip of a coin), followed by an open-label phase in which all participants receive erenumab. Erenumab has been FDA-approved for use in adults to decrease the frequency of migraine. Patients may be eligible to participate if they have had migraine for at least one year, and agree to come to CHOP's main hospital for several study visits. Patients whose headache started suddenly (New Daily Persistent Headache), patients whose headache started after a concussion (Post-Traumatic Headache), and patients with severe depression are not eligible for this study.

Trial of erenumab for preventive treatment of pediatric migraine 15 days per month or more

This study is a trial comparing the effects of erenumab to placebo in children ages 6-17 years old with migraine 15 days per month or more. Eligible participants will be given either erenumab or placebo, assigned randomly (like the flip of a coin), followed by an open-label phase in which all participants receive erenumab. Erenumab has been FDA-approved for use in adults to decrease the frequency of migraine. Patients may be eligible to participate if they have had migraine for at least one year, and agree to come to CHOP's main hospital for several study visits. Patients whose headache started suddenly (New Daily Persistent Headache), patients whose headache started after a concussion (Post-Traumatic Headache), and patients with severe depression are not eligible for this study.


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