Community Pediatrics and Advocacy Program (CPAP)

Our mission

The mission of the Community Pediatrics and Advocacy Program (CPAP) is to teach residents to become pediatricians who:

  • Are as comfortable and competent in their role as child advocates, as they are in their medical practice.
  • Effectively advocate for an individual child and family, as well as all children in their community on a city, state, regional and national level.
  • Work in partnership with community-based agencies to promote the well-being of children.
  • Create an expanded focus on community-based pediatrics and advocacy throughout the Hospital.

In cooperation with community partners, and based on the medical model of teaching (observe, learn, practice skills, then teach), CPAP combines didactic presentations and practical, interactive educational opportunities with independent and increasing community-based work as more advocacy skills are acquired. Community practice of medicine in the primary care centers continues throughout the residency with a strong advocacy base to frame the experience.

A four-week block of time in each year of residency is dedicated to the integration of advocacy and community pediatrics. In the intern year during the Development-Advocacy rotation, residents begin to acquire advocacy skills as they learn about community resources, begin to problem-solve medical cases that involve education and disability law and visit the homes of patients.

The Adolescent-Advocacy rotation for second-year residents provides opportunities to use learned advocacy skills by teaching in elementary schools, juvenile detention facilities, and observing the dependency and child welfare system.

Third-year residents lead advocacy campaigns prior to Pediatric Grand Rounds, take charge of leading the Advocacy Journal Club during their assigned rotation, and are prepared to develop an Advocacy Project of their own which is presented at a CPAP Advocacy Noon Conference poster session.

How do we define advocacy for a pediatrician?

Child advocacy is the active support of ideas, strategies or actions that seek to improve the health and well-being of individual children or adolescents, their families and communities. The goals of child advocacy include:

  • Achieving social justice for youth
  • Empowering families
  • Assisting communities to support the healthy development of children and adolescents

Advocates work to affect the condition of an individual, either directly or indirectly, by fostering the health of families, communities, and populations.

Children and adolescents need strong advocates. They cannot vote, have no political voice, and often have little or no control over their environments. Child and adolescent morbidities have specific biological and behavioral determinants. Advocates who truly understand children are needed to maintain and enhance vital health and educational services, resources, and entitlements. Public policy and legislative advocacy are needed to address system-level problems on the local, state and federal level.

Pediatricians, regardless of specialty, advocate for children and adolescents every day. The American Academy of Pediatrics defines pediatricians as physicians who strive to attain optimal physical, mental, emotional, and social health and well-being for all infants, children, adolescents and young adults. Pediatricians have a unique opportunity to address all aspects of health and wellness that cannot be achieved by medical treatment alone.

Senior Advocacy Projects

Senior Advocacy Projects are the capstone of the CPAP curriculum and training. Development and completion of a Senior Advocacy Project provides residents with an opportunity to apply advocacy skills and lessons learned throughout residency to achieve “real life” community advocacy.

Every project will be different due to the unique contribution of the residents. Residents may decide to work alone or in pairs or groups, within or across rotations. Some residents will choose their project based on a particular advocacy skill they want to improve and further develop, while others base their projects on an advocacy issue of interest identified either through CPAP or as life work. It is possible for residents to develop their own project, or advance an ongoing project with additional advocacy goals and objectives.

Examples of Senior Advocacy Projects

See more Senior Advocacy Projects »

Advocacy campaigns

The Community Pediatrics and Advocacy Program (CPAP), in conjunction with community partners, has conducted advocacy campaigns prior to Pediatric Grand Rounds since 2002. Since 2008, third-year residents lead the Grand Rounds Advocacy Campaign Initiative during their advocacy rotation. Advocacy campaigns demonstrate to the residents, faculty and hospital staff that child advocacy can be accessible and time-efficient. With prepared fact sheets and sample letters to government officials, we are making a difference for patients and families.

Advocacy campaigns are designed to:

  • Encourage (and make it easy for) all hospital staff to sign/address letters to government officials about a timely child advocacy issue; or
  • Enhance awareness about an important advocacy issue directly affecting children, families and the community-at-large

Graduate Education Committee (GEC)

At CHOP, our Graduate Education Committee (GEC) serves to review the educational aspects of the various rotations experienced by our pediatric resident trainees.

The committee is comprised of faculty education liaisons from the various divisions in the Department of Pediatrics and the Department of Critical Care. The resident committee members are representative of their training year class (five to six per class) from the categorical pediatrics program, peds-neurology, peds-genetics and medicine-pediatrics training programs (two representatives). Each of the division chiefs also sits on the committee.

Although specific rotations are reviewed at each meeting, the focus of the meeting concentrates on common themes, tested solutions and shared suggestions for improvement. The GEC also serves as Faculty Advisory Council, along with resident participation, as an annual review of the program.

Chop docs

How to Apply

Residents are selected through the National Resident Matching Program. You must apply using the ERAS System. Deadline for submissions is Dec. 1.

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Why Choose Us?

CHOP's Pediatrics Residency Program offers a balanced, flexible and supportive experience in a top ranked children's hospital. Residents train in cutting-edge facilities, surrounded by world-renowned faculty.


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