Recommended Children’s Books

Find recommended children’s books that focus on a variety of topics such as healthcare, social-emotional well-being, diversity and inclusion.

Children’s Books: ADHD

Children’s Books: Allergies

  • Alberto's Allergies
    • "Alberto finds that he cannot stop sneezing when he wakes up. When Alberto's mom takes him to the doctor he finds out he is allergic to dust. Alberto learns how he can help his allegeries and feel better."
  • Peony's Peanut Allergy
    • "Peony's dcotor comes to her class to teach her classmates about peanut allergies and why they can be so dangerous. This books does a great job of explaining what an allergy is, why it can be so dangerous, and how we can help children who have them."

Children’s Books: Amputation

  • “Amputeddy Meets Nubby Bear”
    • This is a story about bears who are each missing a limb. Together they learn how each plays and does day-to-day activities. They also talk about getting  prosthetic limbs to help them. Ages 4+
  • “Burgess and Marie Bear”
    • This book is about Burgess Bear, who is born with one leg, and how he learned to do everything that all his friends could do. Ages 4+

Children’s Books: Asthma

  • “I'm Tougher Than Asthma!” 
    • This book is about an 8-year-old girl who likes to play like everyone else. She describes how she is learning about asthma and how to better manage her condition. Ages 5+
  • “Taking asthma to Camp: A Fictional Story about Asthma Camp”
    • This book is a fictional story about a child going to asthma camp. It teaches children who have asthma that they are just like everyone else and can have a great time at camp. Ages 4+
  • “Taking Asthma to School (2nd ed.)”
    • This book helps to teach school-age children that classmates with asthma are just regular kids. It provides parents and teachers with the opportunity to talk about classmates who might have asthma. Ages 5+

Children’s Books: Autism

  • Get to know Monroe
    • This book "takes you on a poetic journey through a day in the life of five-year-old Monroe" and acts as a tool to teach children about autism.
  • “Andy and His Yellow Frisbee”
    • A new girl at school has lots of questions about why Andy keeps spinning his yellow Frisbee. Andy’s brother tries to explain how the repetitive motion soothes him. Included is a “what is autism?” section for readers looking for additional information. Ages 5-10
  • “My Friend has Autism”
    • Nick talks about all the fun things he likes to do with his friend, Zack, who has autism, while weaving key facts about autism seamlessly into the storyline. Throughout this book there are “Did You Know” sections for those looking for more information on autism. Ages 4-10
  • “Taking Autism to School”
    • In this story, Angel talks about her friend, Sam, who has autism and helps to explain some common characteristics of autism. This story helps to normalize autism to both children affected with autism as well as their peers. Ages 4-8

Children’s Books: Cardiac

  • Eve's EKG and Echocardiogram
    • "Eve is at cheerleading practice, one day, when all of a sudden she begins to have pain in her chest. She is taken to the hospital and the doctors and nurses tell Eve that she will have to have an EKG and echocardiogram so that they can learn more about the pain and heart.
  • “How Will They Get That Heart Down Your Throat? A Child’s View of Transplants”
    • A kindergarten class learns their teacher needs a heart transplant. Specific topics such as organ donation, descriptions of the transplant operation, post-op medication, and promotion of organ donation are discussed. Ages 7+
  • “Zip-Line”
    • A rhyming story about a young girl who had heart surgery. She tells the story of how she got the scar on her chest and how she isn’t any different from anyone else. Ages 5+

Children’s Books: Chronic Illness

  • “Little Tree: A Story for Children with Serious Medical Problems”
    • A story about a tree that loses some of its branches during a storm and its journey to healing both physically and emotionally. This book is recommended for children who have experienced life-changing illnesses or accidents by providing comfort, inspiration and an inner sense of well-being. Ages 4-8

Children’s Books: Cystic Fibrosis

  • “Cadberry's Letters”
    • A story about Cadberry, a bunny with cystic fibrosis, that explains the genetic disease and common treatments. It helps normalize cystic fibrosis for younger patients and offers simple ways to talk about the disorder with peers. Ages 3-8
  • “Taking Cystic Fibrosis To School (1st ed.)”
    • A story about a school-age girl living with cystic fibrosis. She helps to explain the genetic disease and how she lives a normal life with a few modifications. This story is good to help teach classmates about cystic fibrosis. Ages 5+

Children’s Books: Diabetes

  • “Cooper Has Diabetes”
    • This book tells the story of when Cooper was brought to the hospital and was diagnosed with diabetes. It includes general information about a hospital visit, while highlighting diagnosis-specific information such as checking blood sugars, insulin injections, and the importance of balanced diet. Ages 4-8
  • “Taking Diabetes to School”
    • Jayson, a young boy with diabetes, describes his disease, how he checks his blood sugars regularly, and how receives insulin injections to keep his body working properly. The book also offers information so peers can understand the illness as well. Ages 4-8

Children’s Books: Dialysis

  • “Hannah Has Dialysis”
    • Hannah, a little girl who receives automated peritoneal dialysis at home, talks about her kidneys being sick and why she needs to have dialysis. She describes the basic steps of receiving dialysis at home and how it makes her feel better so she can enjoy the fun things she likes to do. Ages 3-10

Children’s Books: Disabilities

  • My Buddy
    • "This easy to read, first-person narrative of an unusal friendship dempstrate the desires of the handicapped to be independent and to be treated like everyone else." School Library Journal
  • Passion's Paralysis
    • "Passion is a young girl who is paralyzed and in a wheel chair. The story starts at a support group that Passion is leading to help other children like herself deal with the confusion, and enormous challenge of living life in a wheel chair. The children take turns sharing how their accidents caused their type of paralysis and a doctor, who helped Passion, helps the group to learn about the spinal cord and its importance. This book ends by providing hope to children that though they are paralyzed, there are so many ways for them to still enjoy the activities and ways of life they enjoyed before."
  • Roxy the Raccoon: A Story to Help Children Learn about Disability and Inclusion (Truth & Tails Children's Books)
    • Roxy is a raccoon, who lives in the woods with many friends. Roxy is also in a wheel chair. She finds it hard to join in on fun in the woods, and keep up with her peers; as her chair limits where she can go and how she can participate. Roxy's friends team up, however, to show her that games and fun are always better when everyone can be a part. They find special, creative ways to make sure that Roxy's wheelchair doesn't get in the way of any fun to be had!
  • “A Special Raccoon: Helping a Child Learn About Handicaps and Love”
    • Reena the Raccoon meets a new friend, Bluebell, and introduces her to her sister, Brookie. She helps teach Bluebell the many similarities and differences about people with handicaps. Features additional tips for parents/educators and kids/siblings. Ages 4-8
  • “My Back Brace and Me”
    • Children who just started wearing a back brace, or soon will be, can benefit from reading this book which helps boost self-esteem and details activities a patient can still enjoy while using the brace. Ages 5-8
  • “Someone Special Just Like You”
    • Shows that the differences that seem to separate children with disabilities from others are not important. What is important is the common delight in life — a desire to love, learn and play, and to be accepted for who they are. Ages 7-11
  • “We'll Paint the Octopus Red”
    • A story about a sister about to have a baby brother with Down syndrome. She talks with her father about ways she can play with her new sibling, and learns how it may impact the way they play. The book also addresses common questions about Down syndrome. Ages 5+

Children’s Books: Diversity and Inclusion

  • We've Got the Whole World in Our Hands, Rafael Lopez
    • A andaptatoin of the song, "He's  Got the Whole World in Our Hands". A story that encourages children to be inclusive and celebrate diversity all around them.
  • My Papi Has a Motorcycle, Isabel Quintero
    • A story about a little girl and her father who immigrated to the US. They go on motorcylce rides and she reminisces about all of her latin american cultural experience.
  • We are Water Protectors, Carole Lindstrom and Michaela Goade
    • This story is told from a child's point of view. It is about the people and culture of a place called Standing Rock. They are dedicated to preserving their environment and  do so with pride.
  • Going Down Home with Daddy, Kelly Starling Lyons
    • A story about a young boy and his family who travel to his great-grandmothers farm for a family reunion. He considers how he will celebrate and pay tribute to his family's history as he listens to others share memories from over the years.
  • Introducing Teddy, Jessica Walton
    • A story about gender identity and friendship. Thomas the teddy confides in his friend Errol that he is truly girl teddy not a boy teddy. He prefers to be called Tilly from now on. Errol supports Tilly and acknowledges that no matter what they are great friends.
  • Hair Love, Matthew A. Cherry
    • Zuri’s hair has a mind of its own. It kinks, coils, and curls every which way. Zuri knows it’s beautiful. When Daddy steps in to style it for an extra special occasion, he has a lot to learn. But he LOVES his Zuri, and he’ll do anything to make her — and her hair — happy.Tender and empowering, Hair Love is an ode to loving your natural hair — and a celebration of daddies and daughters everywhere.
  • I Promise, Lebron James
    • This inspring picture book focuses on the importance of perseverance and striving for greatness by making promises to yourself and your community to be better. The promises range from being kind to others, trying new things, asking for help, and standing up for what's right.
  • Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut, Denene Millner
    • This high spirited, rhythmic book is a celebration of the self esteem and confidence that black boys feel when they leave the barber's chair with a "fresh cut."  This confidence confirms their brilliance and worth encouraging them love themsleves and be proud of how they present themselves to the world.
  • I am Jazz, Jazz Jennings
    • This is a story about a transgender girl who discovers what it means to "have a girl brain but a boy body."  It goes through the story of her growing up feeling this way and learning from a doctor what transgender means and her family and friends' acceptance of this.  It also touches on people who may not be as accepting to her but the true importance of her loving herself. 
  • The Day You Begin, Jacqueline Woodson
    • We all feel like outsiders sometimes. This book is about  how it is brave to go forth anyway. And that sometimes, when we reach out and begin to share our stories, others will be happy to meet us halfway. This book celebrates diversity and how some people have qualities just like you, and others have qualities that are different and unique. This book that shows the many ways  kids can feel different than their peers.
  • The Name, Jar Yangsook
    • Joi Being the new kid in school is hard enough, but what about when nobody can pronounce your name? Having just moved from Korea, Unhei is anxious that American kids will like her.  Though she is nervous to be different because of her unique name, she comes to realize that is a very special part of who she is. This book is a wonderful celebration of cultural differences.
  • Side by Side Lado a Lado, Monica Brown
    • A book celebrating the work of Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta - two people who fought for the rights and safety of migrant workers in California.  This book shows how two people can make a difference and give a voice to those workers.
  • A Family is Family, Sarah O'Leary
    • Every family is special. Whether you have lots of grandparents, two moms or dads, divorced parents, or fosterparents.  This book highlights that a family is a family, no matter how different it may look.
  • Mama's Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation, Edwidge Danticat
    • A story about a little girl whose mother, an immagrant, has been emprisioned after not having the proper documentation. To ease the distance between them while she’s in jail, Mama begins sending Saya bedtime stories inspired by Haitian folklore on cassette tape. Moved by her mother's tales and her father's attempts to reunite their family, Saya writes a story of her own—one that just might bring her mother home for good. With stirring illustrations, this tender tale shows the human side of immigration and imprisonment—and shows how every child has the power to make a difference.
  • Dreamers, YuYi Morales
    • This lovingly-illustrated picture book memoir looks at the myriad gifts migrantes bring with them when they leave their homes. It’s a story about family that helps to remind us that we are all dreamers, bringing our own strengths wherever we roam. Beautiful and powerful, this is a story that is both topical and timeless.
  • All Because You Matter, Tami Charles
    • Written in the style of lullaby and poem, Tami Charles, offers lovingkindness to her readers in helping children of color understand and know their differences are what make them beautiful.
  • The Family Book, Todd Parr
    • The Family Book celebrates the love we feel for our families and all the different varieties they come in. Whether you have two moms or two dads, a big family or a small family, a clean family or a messy one, Todd Parr assures readers that no matter what kind of family you have, every family is special in its own unique way.
  • We Are Grateful Otsaliheliga, Traci Sorrell
    • This book follows a Native American community as they transition through each of the seasons together. Throughout the year, they are reminded of all of the reasons they have to be grateful. Rich with illustrations depicting Native American culture, this book teaches children about the power of connection, community, and gratitude.
  • When Aidan Became a Brother, Kyle Lukoff
    • When Aidan was born, everyone thought he was a girl. As he grew, parts of his life didn't feel like they fit him anymore and his parents helped him feel more like his true self. When Aidan finds out his mother is having another baby, he already knows the most important thing about being a big brother: how to love with his whole self. When Aidan Became a Brother is a heartwarming book that will resonate with transgender children, reassure any child concerned about becoming an older sibling, and celebrate the many transitions a family can experience.
  • Daddy, Papa, and Me, Lesléa Newman and Carol Thompson
    • Rhythmic text and illustrations with universal appeal show a toddler spending the day with his daddies. From hide-and-seek to dress-up, then bath time and a kiss goodnight, there's no limit to what a loving family can do together. This story shows the loving bond between same-sex parents and their children.
  • My Two Moms and Me, Michael Joosten
    • Families with same-sex parents are celebrated in this board book that follows busy moms and their kids throughout their day—eating breakfast, going on a playdate, heading to the pool for a swim, and settling back in at night with a bedtime story and a good-night lullaby. LGBTQ+ parents and their friends and families will welcome this inclusive and cheerful book that reflects their own lives and family makeup. 
  • Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation, Duncan Tonatiuh
    • Almost 10 years before Brown vs. Board of Education, Sylvia Mendez and her parents helped end school segregation in California. An American citizen of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage who spoke and wrote perfect English, Mendez was denied enrollment to a “Whites only” school. Her parents took action by organizing the Hispanic community and filing a lawsuit in federal district court. Their success eventually brought an end to the era of segregated education in California.
  • Ruth and the Green Book, Calvin Alexander Ramsey and Gwen Strauss
    • Ruth was so excited to take a trip in her family's new car! In the early 1950s, few African Americans could afford to buy cars, so this would be an adventure. But she soon found out that black travelers weren't treated very well in some towns. Many hotels and gas stations refused service to black people. Daddy was upset about something called Jim Crow laws . . Finally, a friendly attendant at a gas station showed Ruth's family The Green Book. It listed all of the places that would welcome black travelers. With this guidebook—and the kindness of strangers—Ruth could finally make a safe journey from Chicago to her grandma's house in Alabama. Ruth's story is fiction, but The Green Book and its role in helping a generation of African American travelers avoid some of the indignities of Jim Crow are historical fact.
  • Malcolm Little: The Boy Who Grew Up to Become Malcolm X, Ilyasah Shabazz
    • Malcolm X grew to be one of America’s most influential figures. But first, he was a boy named Malcolm Little. Written by his daughter, this inspiring picture book biography celebrates a vision of freedom and justice. Bolstered by the love and wisdom of his large, warm family, young Malcolm Little was a natural born leader. But when confronted with intolerance and a series of tragedies, Malcolm’s optimism and faith were threatened. He had to learn how to be strong and how to hold on to his individuality. He had to learn self-reliance. Together with acclaimed illustrator AG Ford, Ilyasah Shabazz gives us a unique glimpse into the childhood of her father, Malcolm X, with a lyrical story that carries a message that resonates still today—that we must all strive to live to our highest potential.
  • The Rabbit Listened, Cori Doerrfeld
    • A moving and universal picture book about empathy and kindness, sure to soothe heartaches big and small—now a New York Times bestseller. When something sad happens, Taylor doesn't know where to turn. All the animals are sure they have the answer. One by one, the animals try to tell Taylor how to act, and one by one they fail to offer comfort. Then the rabbit arrives. All the rabbit does is listen . . . which is just what Taylor needs. With its spare, poignant text and irresistibly sweet illustration, The Rabbit Listened is about how to comfort and heal the people in your life, by taking the time to carefully, lovingly, gently listen.
  • We Are Different, We are the Same, Bobbi Kates
    • Elmo and his Sesame Street friends help teach toddlers and the adults in their lives that everyone is the same on the inside, and it's our differences that make this wonderful world, which is home to us all, an interesting—and special—place. This enduring, colorful, and charmingly illustrated book offers an easy, enjoyable way to learn about differences—and what truly matters. We’re Different, We’re the Same is an engaging read for toddlers and adults alike that reinforces how we all have the same needs, desires, and feelings.
  • Future Astronaut, Lori Alexander
    • An encouraging book for young children of all ethnicities. Even from infanthood, babies and young children have what it takes to be whatever they want to - even an astronaut!
  • Black is a Rainbow Color, Angela Joy
    • A story that uses imagery of every day objects and moments in history to reflect on what it means to be Black.
  • A Girl Like Me, Angela Johnson
    • A silly and colorful story that empowers young readers to defy social norms, embrace their individuality and follow their hearts.
  • Little Hereos of Color, David Heredia
    • A picture book to introduce young readers to various leaders and trailblazers throughout history.
  • Future Engineer, Lori Alexander
    • This board book empowers young children by teaching them how their current skills already match up to the skills needed to be an engineer in any field they choose!

Children’s Books: Emotional Trauma

  • A Terrible Thing Happened
    • A story of a raccoon that experiences something terrible he cannot forget about. This book doesn’t describe the terrible thing — only the feeling and emotions it provokes. The story encourages children to talk about their feelings and things that scare them in order to bring them peace and closure. Ages 4-8

Children’s Books: Family

  • "Sex and Babies. First Facts”
    • This book is for children who are ready for the complete, but basic, story about sexual reproduction. With illustrations and simple terms, the book explains the male and female body, human sexuality, conception, pregnancy, fetal development and birth. Ages 5-9
  • My Friend Jen: A Little Different
    • This book is about Jen, a girl who has Sickle Cell. This story provides encouragement in how to stay well with Sickle Cell, while also educating readers on the disease.
  • Super Coco: Will you be my friend?
    • Lengthy, and takes awhile to get to the point, but the message is sweet.
  • “All Kinds of Families”
    • This story provides examples of what a family can look like and how families can change over time. From nuclear families to multi-generational families, this book addresses the bonds that brings people together. Ages 5-7
  • “Families Are Different”
    • An adopted Korean girl has trouble finding her own identity until she discovers her classmates have different types of families and that everyone is different. This book explores how love connects each family. Ages 4+
  • “The Family Book”
    • This story shows how families come in different forms and explains how important it is to accept our differences as a family. It encourages children to ask questions about their own families and understand the many people who love them. Ages 3-6

Children’s Books: Feelings/Emotions

  • A VERY Hungry Worry Monster
    • Teaches kids about all kinds of monsters that can help with any kind of worry or fear. It is fun and silly, but gives strategies to helping kids calm when worried.
  • All Feelings are Okay
    • Children can learn about the wide range of emotions they have and think of times where they may have felt each of them. Prompts with spaces for drawing and writing help children to reflect on their own experiences and ways they can manage difficult emotions.
  • Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage
    • This book is about older sister who explains to her younger sister all the things she used to be afraid of, along with some tricks to help, whether it’s a special blanket for bedtime or singing during a storm. This book provides examples of fear and bravery, empowering kids to confront scary situations.
  • In My Heart: A Book of Feelings
    • In My Heart explores a full range of emotions, describing how they feel physically, inside. With language that is lyrical but also direct, toddlers will be empowered by this new vocabulary and able to practice articulating and identifying their own emotions.
  • Ruby Finds a Worry
    • Ruby has a worry. No one can see it, but it gets too big. She learns that if she talks about her worry than it will get smaller.
  • Strictly No Elephants
    • In this story, a boy and his pet elephant are excluded from the Pet Club, and instead create their own club to include everyone. This book encourages inclusion and valuing friends of different shapes and sizes.
  • The Color Monster: A Pop-up Book of Feelings
    • A monster and his friend (a girl) attempt to organize the monster's emotions, by explaining each one, how it makes you feel and then putting them each in a jar. This helps the monster to understand each feeling apart from the other, and define the ones that he has never understood before. With his feeling "sorted out" he is better able to experience them; each on their own. The colorful illustrations, and pop-ups throughout each page, make this book a delightful interactive story that provides wonderful descriptions of feelings such as fear, anger and happiness in age appropriate ways.
  • The Don't Worry Book
    • This thoughtful book gives many examples of what makes kids worry and suggestions on what helps when they are worried.
  • The Kissing Hand
    • "Chester Raccoon is nervous to start school and leave his mother. His mother tells him a secret that if she kisses his paw, he can look down at his paw at school and always be reminded of his mother and her love. A great book for a child about separation and comfort."
  • The Rabbit Listened
    • This book tells the story of a young child named Taylor, who creates a block tower. It unexpectedly (as we find with tragedy and loss) comes crashing down. Many animal friends attempt to help Taylor through the pain, grief, and frustration that comes with losing something special to you, but none of them and their efforts seem to help Taylor. Then along comes rabbit, who listens. He shows empathy to the child and is able to support the journey of healing, by simply being present and listening.
  • The Way I Feel
    • This book is similar to "In My Heart". It discusses feelings such as boredom, frustration, jealousy and disappointment. There is a great note to parents in the back about how to talk to children about feelings.
  • When You Are Brave
    • This book talks about what it means to be brave and have courage in the face of uncertainty.
  • “Alexander and the Dragon”
    • Alexander is a young boy who is scared of the dark. He thinks the shadows in his room are monsters. Alexander decides he is going to make friends with the dragon under his bed. Ages 4+
  • “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day”
    • This book assists children in coping with their emotions by following Alexander as he battles through many obstacles, making for a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. Ages 6-9
  • “All Feelings Are OK: It's What You Do With Them That Counts”
    • This workbook/coloring book teaches children through creative use of their own definitions that all feelings are “OK;” it’s how we choose to respond and act when we feel a certain way that matters most. Age 5+
  • “Bravery Soup”
    • A story about Carlin, a young raccoon, who is scared of lots of things. He goes to Big Bear, the bravest animal, for help. Ages 3-7
  • “Crazy Like a Fox: A Simile Story”
    • The book explores Rufus the fox in a story of similes leading to his birthday party. Ages 4-7
  • “Double-Dip Feelings: Stories to Help Children Understand”
    • This book walks children through the many instances in which they would be feeling two emotions at the same time, in settings such as school, with siblings and at home. Ages 4-8
  • “Face Your Feelings! A Book to Help Children Learn About Feelings”
    • This book gives examples of why kids may feel different feelings. It provides many examples of feelings children may experience along with photos of real people acting out that particular emotion. Ages 3+
  • “Feelings”
    • This book follows a school-age boy through many feelings associated with peers, caregivers and his own feelings in rhyming sequences. Ages 4-7
  • “Glad Monster, Sad Monster: A Book About Feelings”
    • The monsters in this book talk about different feelings and give examples of what makes them feel the different feelings. The story asks children to talk about what makes them feel glad, angry, loving, sad, worried, scared or silly. Ages 3-6
  • “How Full Is Your Bucket”
    • This book follows Felix throughout his day as the water in his bucket increases and decreases with the emotions of the day. Ages 3-8
  • “I Was So Mad”
    • This book follows a little girl as she tells readers why she gets mad. The book emphasizes that it is alright to be mad sometimes and normalizes the sometimes frustrating emotion. Ages 4+
  • “Miss Rumphius”
    • This story takes you through the life of Miss Rumphius who keeps a promise she made to her grandfather to make the world a more beautiful place. Ages 5-10
  • “My Many Colored Days”
    • Dr. Seuss uses his rhyming fashion to explain to children different feelings that they can have by giving emotions a color that we can feel in the day. Ages 3-7
  • “Proud of Our Feelings”
    • Priscilla follows her friends and their feelings. This book fosters discussion by asking children when was the last time they felt the same emotions as the characters in this book. Ages 3-6
  • “Sometimes It’s Hard to Be Five: Learning How to Work My Control Panel”
    • This book addresses the challenges of being a 5-year-old, such as interacting with siblings and peers, growing, discipline, hygiene and school. But in the end, it’s fun to be 5. Ages 4-8
  • “Tease Monster: A Book About Teasing Vs. Bullying”
    • This book follows “One of a Kind” as he battles challenges with bullying. He and his mother make a plan on what to say when he is teased again. Ages 5-12
  • “The Feelings Book”
    • This book shows examples of many emotions, from feeling lonely to feeling silly. The book advises children that no matter how they feel, they should not keep these feelings inside, but share them with someone they love. Ages: 3-6
  • “Today I feel Silly: And Other Moods That Make My Day”
    • This book follows a school-age girl as she tells of all the feelings she is having and why. At the end of the book, children are able to identify how they feel from silly, happy and excited to cranky, angry and sad. Ages 4-8
  • “Unstoppable Me! 10 Ways to Soar Through Life”
    • This book teaches 10 life lessons through short rhyming explanations that grab children’s attention. Themes such as persistence, having choices, creating peace and being healthy are explored. It includes examples and illustrations of how children may apply the lesson to their everyday life. Ages 4-8
  • “Wemberly Worried”
    • This book helps children transition back to school by following Wemberly as she returns to school. Wemberly worries about almost everything, but when she meets a new friend at school, she is finally able to put some of those worries aside. Ages 4-8
  • “When Sophie Gets Angry — Really, Really Angry...”
    • A story about a little girl who becomes very angry about sharing her toys with her sister. The story shows how Sophie calms herself down after she gets really upset. Ages 4-8
  • “Wilma Jean the Worry Machine”
    • This book follows Wilma as she identifies all the things that make her worry. Her teacher helps her decide whether these are worries she can control or not. There is a helpful page for parents with tips on dealing with an anxious child. Ages 7-10
  • “Zach Gets Frustrated”
    • This book follows Zach as he goes to the beach and has to learn how to handle frustrations by naming them, finding ways to tame them and reframing them from negative thoughts into positive ones. Ages 4-7

Children’s Books: Going to the Hospital/Doctor

  • Sloth Goes to the Hospital
    • The intention of this book is to offer education about these creative modalities, while also promoting normalization and adjustment to the hospital experience. It also provides an index of information pertaining to how these resources can be accessed and utilized at CHOP.
  • "Do I Have to Go to the Hospital? A First Look at Going to Hospital”
    • This book focuses on the emotional experiences of going to the hospital and identifies common places that children would encounter. Ages 4-8
  • "It's Check-up Time, Elmo!"
    • This book helps kids be less scared from going to the doctor. Elmo helps keep kids company so a check-up can be about learning something new.
  • Daniel Visits the Doctor
    • Daniel's mom helps him get ready for a doctor's appointment that he is nervous about. She creates a book for him to prepare him for what might happen at the visit. Daniel is able to conquer his fear of the doctor.
  • My First Hospital Visit
    • "Mindy, and her classmates, are working on a project for school, and are visiting a hospital. A representative from the hospital, helps them explore the many (common) areas that a hospital has, and along the way, Mindy and her friends meet many of the staff; from Child Life Specialists, to a Surgeon and Phlebotomist, and even get to see some children/patients in a playroom. While Mindy starts off her field trip, nervous to learn about a place that she knows to be scary, she by the end understands how everyone and everything at the hospital is there to help!"
  • Operation Breathe Easy: A Child's Lung Transplant Story
    • This book is about a boy who finds out that his lungs are sick and he needs a lung transplant. It address questions that some children might have when finding out the same information. It is a valuable resource for young children. Ages 4-8
  • Sammy Hits a Home run
    • Sammy is a young boy who loves baseball and being with this best friends. As school ends and summer starts, Sammy and his friends share their love of the sport by joining up one day for a game. Sammy isn't feeling well and during the game becomes so ill he must be rushed to the hospital. There the doctors and his family help him cope with the discovery that he has a brain tumor. This story shows the experience of a diagnosis through the eyes of an eight-year-old, and what he learns about kind doctors and nurses who care for him, the love he is surrounded by in the friends and family he has, and even with a brain tumor, you can still live life fully, enjoying all that you love; including baseball.
  • The Berenstain Bears: Hospital Friends
    • The Berenstain Bears take a trip to the hospital and get a special tour! While Brother and Sister Bear see all the amazing things that happen in the hospital, they make new friends along the way! Young readers will learn about doctors, nurses, patients, and more in this fun and informative 8x8 storybook.
  • The Little Encyclopedia of the Human Body
    • This child-friendly encyclopedia helps children to explore the human body with fun facts and pictures. It also provides information about fertilization. Ages 9+
  • The Magic School Bus: Inside the Human Body
    • Ms. Frizzle and her class get eaten by Arnold and begin their fantastic trip through the human body.
  • Will Jax Be Home for Thanksgiving? When A Child Has A Brain Tumor.
    • I wish it had more details about what a tumor is but otherwise, it's a good resource about the hospital experience and after d/c. "This book helps to paint the picture of the patient's experience before and after a big surgery. The author tells the story from the sibling's point of view, helping to clear up misconceptions and provide education."
  • “A Visit to the Sesame Street Hospital”
    • This book follows Grover for his trip to the hospital for a tonsillectomy. Grover’s mother bring him to the hospital for a tour exploring the patient rooms, X-ray  machine, playroom, operating room, library and much more to ease his fear. Ages 4-8
  • “All Better Now”
    • This interactive, rhyming story is perfect for preschool children. It teaches kids why they get sick and how they get better with medicine or rest. Ages 3+
  • “Big Bird Goes to the Doctor”
    • This book follows Big Bird and Granny as he goes for a check-up with the doctor. Big Bird expresses his emotions about the visit as he gets his height, weight and temperature taken and his eyes checked. Ages 4-8
  • “Cooper Gets a CT Scan”
    • When Cooper falls and hits his head, his doctor wants him to have a CT scan to make sure everything is OK. This book does a great job at explaining what a CT scan is and the different things that kids will see and feel and may be asked to do during the scan. Ages 4-8
  • “Curious George Goes to the Hospital”
    • This story follows George as he accidently eats a piece of a jigsaw puzzle. He visits the doctor’s office, and after an X-ray, he is admitted to the hospital for surgery. Follow George through surgery, making friends, and causing some trouble. Ages 4-8
  • “Franklin Goes to the Hospital”
    • This book follows Franklin for his first trip to the hospital for surgery to fix his shell after being hit by a soccer ball. It explains the use of anesthesia, the hospital environment, X-ray and surgery. Ages 3-8
  • “Going to the Doctor”
    • This book explains each step of a visit to the doctor, from the stethoscope and checking reflexes to eye exams and receiving shots. Ages 4+
  • “Little Critter: My Trip to the Hospital”
    • This book is about Little Critter’s journey to the hospital after a soccer injury. We follow him into the ambulance, X-ray machine, getting a cast, and learning to use crutches. Ages 4-8
  • “The Boo-boo Book”
    • This interactive book explains common childhood injuries, including burns, stitches and rashes. The stories are told in rhymes throughout and have flaps to lift for more information, as well as touch and feel for additional learning. Ages 3+
  • “Tubes in My Ears: My Trip to the Hospital”
    • This book tells the story from the perspective of a young boy named Luke who’s getting ear tubes. Luke talks about having vital signs taken, receiving anesthesia, and recovering from a surgery while sharing his feelings of the process throughout. Ages 4-10

Children’s Books: Grief/Loss

  • “Facing the Death and Celebrating the Life of Someone You Love” 
    • A workbook for school-age children to help with identifying and expressing feelings after the death of someone in their family. Includes pages for children to write or draw pictures of their family and the person who died. Ages 6+
  • “Healing Your Grieving Heart for Teens: 100 Practical Ideas”
    • The grieving process can be especially difficult and overwhelming for teenagers. This journal affirms the grieving teen’s journey and offers gentle, healing guidance. Ages 12+
  • “I Miss You: A First Look at Death”
    • This book helps children understand that death is a natural part of a person’s lifetime. A funeral is discussed as well as the many types of feelings children might have following the death of a loved one. Ages 4+
  • “Lifetimes: A Beautiful Way to Explain Death to Children”
    • Explains life and death in the form of beginnings, endings and living in between. Describes the lifetimes of plants, animals and people in a very easy way for children to understand. Ages 5+
  • “Something Happened: A Book for Children and Parents Who Have Experienced Pregnancy Loss”
    • This book addresses the anticipation of a sibling who is expecting a baby and the sadness when that baby doesn’t come home. A simple, clear story to help young children understand what happened when there has been a pregnancy loss. Ages 3+
  • “The Invisible String”
    • A story that explains to children how to keep loved ones close at heart by imagining that they are connected to them by an invisible string. This helps remind children that they are never alone, and can be helpful in engaging in conversations about separation or loss. Ages 3+
  • “The Next Place”
    • A rhythmic poem with beautiful illustrations that describes what “the next place” might look like without adding a religious context. Appropriate for parents, caregivers and school-age children. Ages 5+
  • “Waterbugs and Dragonflies: Explaining Death to Young Children”
    • A story about two waterbugs and what happens to one when it goes above the water and turns into a dragonfly. After trying to return to the water below and finds it cannot, it realizes that it will be reunited with the other waterbugs one day when they become dragonflies. Ages 4+
  • “We Were Going to Have a Baby but We Had an Angel Instead”
    • Story of grief following the loss of a baby. The book is told from a sibling’s perspective about anticipating a new baby being in the house and the sadness that follows when the baby dies unexpectedly. Ages 3+
  • “What on Earth Do You Do When Someone Dies?”
    • The author speaks directly to kids about what death means and how to cope. Many questions that kids have are asked, such as: How, why, what’s next, what happens to the body etc. Overwhelming emotions and varying emotions are also discussed. Ages 5-10
  • “What’s Heaven?”
    • Kate is a little girl who learns that her great-grandmother has died. Kate and her mom talk about the difference between body and soul, feelings when someone dies, what a funeral is and what they think heaven is like. Ages 5+
  • “Where Are You? A Child’s Book About Loss”
    • A story about the death of a little boy's dad and how he comes to the ultimate realization that within his heart and memory that his dad will continue to be close to him. Ages 4-8

Children’s Books: Guided Imagery

  • A Boy and a Bear
    • This story of a young boy who encounters a polar bear while climbing a snow-covered mountain teaches children relaxation techniques to reduce stress, prepare for sleep, and improve self-confidence.
  • A Boy and a Turtle
    • "This book is an effective tool to teach children how to visualize in order to relax various parts of the body. This story uses the visual of a boy and turtle who 'fill their bodies' with the colors of the rainbow."
  • Breathe Like A Bear
    • This book is meant to be used with a parent or adult. It gives 6 examples for each time of "feeling" or "scenario" to encourage relaxation and manage stress.
  • Bubble Riding: A Relaxation Story
    • "Visualization, also known as creative imagery, can lower stress and anxiety levels. The colorful imagery in this story quiets the mind and relaxes the body so your child can manager stress and fall asleep peacefully." Lori Lite
  • Ready Set Relax
    • A research based program of relaxation, learning, and self esteem for children.
  • Sea Otter Cove
    • "This effective, self-calming technique also known as diaphragmatic breathing can have a positive impact on your child's health. Proper breathing can lower stress and anxiety levels. It can be used to decrease pain and anger." Lori Lite
  • “Imagine a Rainbow: A Child's Guide for Soothing Pain”
    • A book for children to help with relaxation. Encourages using imagination as well as deep breathing in order to cope with pain. Additional section for parents explaining techniques and tips. Ages 2+

Children’s Books: Hearing Impairment

  • “Taking Hearing Impairment to School”
    • Jacob, a young boy with hearing impairment, gives a basic medical description of his condition, as well as common treatments and equipment used by people with hearing issues. A quiz is included for children, as well as a tip section for teachers. Ages 4-8

Children’s Books: Oncology

  • “Kat Alex and the Amazing Lemonade Stand”
    • This is the true story of a young girl named Alex who was diagnosed with cancer. The focus of the story is on Alex’s efforts to raise money for her hospital and other kids battling the disease. This story promotes the idea of positive coping and giving back in an understandable, age-appropriate way. Ages 4+
  • “Taking Cancer to School”
    • Max is a young boy who’s just been diagnosed with leukemia, a form of cancer. Max describes and normalizes a complicated childhood condition. The book helps children identify why a peer may be treated differently and begin to empathize with them. Includes a quiz for children and a tip section for teachers who may have students with cancer. Ages 4-8

Children’s Books: Seizure

  • Mighty Mike Bounces Back: A Boy’s Life With Epilepsy
    • Mike has epilepsy and sometimes it’s hard to feel like a “real” kid. He is scared of letting other people know about his disease — or even worse, being seen having a seizure! Co-written by a real-life basketball star with epilepsy, it's an empowering story written to help kids learn to deal with adversity and to take control of their lives.
  • “Taking Seizure Disorders to School”
    • A story about Jaime, who has epilepsy (seizure disorder). Jaime talks about what seizures are, what they may look like and what it's like to be in school with a seizure disorder. Jaime explains that she is just like everyone else and doesn't want to be treated differently. Ages 3+

Children’s Books: Self-Esteem

  • "I Like Me!”
    • A story of a young African-American girl, Nia, who points out all the positive things she likes about herself. This book is relatable to all children with a simple message of liking everything about themselves. Ages 3-8
  • Affirmation Weaver
    • "Children relate to the dolphin in this story as the sea creatures show him how to believe in himself. Watch your child's self-esteem grow as the sea creatures weave a web of positive statements." - Lori Lite
  • Howie Helps Himself
    • Howie is a young boy in a wheelchair who wants to be independent like his friends and family. He is determined to try to wheel himself with the strength of his arms and the support of his loved ones. This book teaches children that while we may look different, everyone wants to feel loved and accepted.
  • I am a V.I.P. (Very Important Patient)
    • Activity book focused on helping children or young teen with hosptial stay. Helps kids develop rapport with hosptial staff through engaging activities. Supports honest communication and insightfulness. Ages 5-12
  • I Like Myself
    • This book talks about liking yourself even if others think differently.
  • I Walk With Vanessa: A Story About A Simple Act of Kindness
    • "Here is a simple but powerful picture book about how the actions of a single person can inspire an entire community."
  • It's Okay to Be Different
    • This book teaches children important messages such as acceptance, understanding, and having confidence in themselves. With its bright colors and silly pictures, it encourages children to celebrate individuality and respect differences. Ages 3-6
  • Just One YOU!
    • There is only one you who does so many marvelous things.
  • Spaghetti in a Hot Dog Bun
    • Lucy is taught that while everyone is different, everyone has a heart with feelings. Even when she is made fun of, she treats others how she wants to be treated.
  • We're All Wonders
    • Some people look different, and people can only notice those differences. But there are lots of people who have differences, and that makes us all wonders.
  • We're Different. We're the Same. And We're All Wonderful
    • This book helps to point out all of the parts of us that can be different, but also shows us how they are the same.
  • “I Want Your Moo: A Story for Children About Self-esteem”
    • A story about Toodles, a turkey who doesn’t like herself and goes in search of a new voice before she realizes that her gobble can help save the day. This book uses lively rhymes and funny illustrations to help children embrace their differences. Ages 4-8
  • “Just Because I Am: A Child's Book of Affirmation”
    • This book promotes self-esteem in young children by recognizing that all children are unique and special. Short affirmations teach children to listen to their bodies for their physical and emotional needs. Age 3-8

Children’s Books: Sexual Abuse

  • “It's My Body”
    • The book teaches young children about appropriate touching and how to resist touching that makes them feel uncomfortable. Written by an expert in sexual abuse prevention, the story is written to help adults and preschool children talk about sexual abuse in a way that minimizes embarrassment and fear, and emphasizes open communication. Ages 3-8
  • “My Body is Private”
    • A story from a mother to a daughter explaining what parts of her body are private and what to do if someone tries to touch her. This story encourages children to be open and honest when talking to a trustworthy adult about inappropriate touching. Ages 3-8

Children’s Books: Siblings

  • Just Because
    • Clemmie is different than other siblings. Brother doesn't know why, it is just the way she is - just because. This is a beautiful story about accepting sibling differences.
  • What to Expect When the New Baby Comes Home
    • This is a great resource for parents to use as guidance on how to explain a new baby to a sibling. It answers questions like why do new babies eat and sleep so much, and addresses how a sibling can help with the new baby.
  • “My Brother Needs an Operation”
    • This interactive story explains some of the normal reactions of a sibling of a hospitalized child. Throughout this story the author asks question to the person reading it and offers helpful tips for parents. Ages 3+
  • “Sometimes”
    • Together Toby and his sister Clemmie can conquer anything — even the scary hospital — with the right attitude and a dose of fun. This is a positive and light-hearted book that encourages imagination and sibling relationships in order to help children be brave in the hospital and throughout life. Ages 5–7
  • “The Sibling Slam Book: What It's Really Like to Have a Brother or Sister With Special Needs"
    • This book asks questions related to having a sibling with special needs such as: “Does your sibling ever embarrass you?” and “What life lessons have you learned from being a sibling?” The responses from other children and teens dealing with the same issues may be helpful for young adults seeking comradery and someone to relate to. Ages 13+
  • “Views From Our Shoes: Growing Up with a Brother or Sister with Special Needs”
    • In this chapter book, 45 siblings share their experiences as the brother or sister of someone with a disability. Their personal tales introduce young siblings to others like them and allow them to compare experiences. A glossary of disabilities provides easy-to-understand definitions of many of the conditions mentioned. Ages 9+
  • “What About Me?: When Brothers and Sisters Get Sick”
    • Using the story of siblings, Laura and Tom, this book explores how a child may be feeling and reacting to their sibling being in the hospital. It also includes an introduction to parents on how to help their children cope with a sibling’s illness. Ages 4-10
  • “When Molly Was in the Hospital: A Book for Brothers and Sisters of Hospitalized Children”
    • Through Anna’s actions and words, this book addresses many emotions that children may feel while their sibling is in the hospital, such as anger, fear, guilt, loss and worry. The books also provides suggestions on how to stay in touch and show support while someone is in the hospital. Ages 4-10

Children’s Books: Vision Impairment

  • “Luna and the Big Blur”
    • Luna doesn’t like her name and doesn’t like to wear her glasses. But when Luna's father explains the meaning of her name, it helps Luna feel good about herself and she decides to wear her glasses. Ages 5+