Reading with Children Video: Tips from Reach out and Read

This series of short videos provides tips for reading out loud to children from the experts at CHOP's Reach out and Read Program. Reach out and Read is a nonprofit organization that gives young children a foundation for success by incorporating books into pediatric care and encouraging families to read aloud together.

The Reach Out and Read chapter at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1996. At nine primary care practices in the CHOP Care Network, pediatricians and nurse practitioners encourage parents to read to their children and give children a new book at each well visit from ages 6 months to 5 years. Approximately 38,000 books are given each year through the program.

Families served by the program read together more often and their children enter kindergarten with larger vocabularies and stronger language skills, better prepared to achieve to their potential.

 

Transcript

Reading with Your Infant: Tips from Reach Out and Read

Dr. Haecker: I'm Dr. Trude Haecker, a pediatrician at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia where we have a special program called Reach Out and Read to help children and parents discover the joy of reading together.

This short video will help you pick out books and find ways to read with your infant. Let's start by picking out a book.

At this age your baby is probably putting everything into her mouth. That's one way she learns about the world around her. A sturdy board book or a soft cloth book will be safe in case she chews on it. Babies like brightly colored board books to touch and to explore. Smaller books are easier for them to hold on to with their very small hands. Infants really like pictures of things they see every day; balls, bottles, dogs and babies. Babies love to look at pictures of babies. Here a mom cuddles, sings, talks and plays while reading a book to her baby.

Mom: Babies love to play! Babies love to shout.

Dr. Haecker: It's OK if your baby's putting the book in her mouth or dropping it on the floor. Even though your baby may only coo, babble or say ma or ba or da, that is your baby's way of talking.

Mom: I know it's yours.

Dr. Haecker: Point and name things in the book while reading to your baby.

Mom: Baby loves to laugh.

Dr. Haecker: Babies respond to hearing their own name. In this scene the mom uses the book to play games with her baby such as peek-a-boo or patty cake while saying her baby's name. At this stage it's all about making reading fun. You'll get a new book through Reach Out and Read at every well child checkup until your child is 5 years old. Feel free to remind your pediatrician or nurse practitioner about your Reach Out and Read book.

And remember you can read wherever you are. At the bus stop, in the park, at the library, even in the waiting room before a doctor’s appointment. Have fun.

Reading with Your Young Toddler: Tips from Reach Out and Read

Dr. Haecker: I'm Dr. Trude Haecker, a pediatrician at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia where we have a very special program called Reach Out and Read to help children and parents discover the joy of reading together.

This short video will help you pick out books and find ways to read with your young toddler who is between one and two years of age. Let’s start by picking out a book.

Even though your young toddler isn't putting the book in her mouth as much as she did as a baby the pages of the board book are still easier for her to turn on her own. Books with a few words are okay even though she isn't reading on her own yet.

Any topic will work but you will love reading about things you do every day; sleeping, eating, or playing. Here a mom with a young toddler reads while the child moves around. It's okay if your toddler doesn't pay attention or explores while you are reading. Your child is taking the world in but will come back to the book in her own time. Don't get frustrated if you read the same book 100 or maybe even a thousand times. Just keep reading.

Young toddlers are practicing with sounds and learning to talk. They can say single words and gradually work up to two to four word phrases. They will also point at and name pictures in the book. Here the toddler and her mom make sounds and sing songs while reading the book. Smile and answer when your child speaks or points. Let your child help turn the pages.

Toddlers love routines. They love a bed time, potty time, or bath time book. Here the mom reads to the toddler before bed time. As you start to work on potty training and getting your child to sleep through the night make a book part of those daily routines.

There are many ways you and your family can read and share books with your toddler. You'll get a new book through Reach out and Read at every well child check up until your child is five years old. Feel free to remind your pediatrician or nurse practitioner about your reach out and read book. And remember you can read wherever you are; at the bus stop, in the park, at the library, even in the waiting room before a doctor’s appointment. Have fun.

Reading with Your Older Toddler: Tips from Reach Out and Read

Dr. Haecker: Reading together is a simple way to nurture and bond with your child. I'm Dr. Trude Haecker, a pediatrician at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia where we have a special program called Reach Out and Read to help children and parents discover the joy of reading together.

This short video will help you pick out books and find ways to read with your older toddler who's between 2 and 3 years of age. The goal is for you and your toddler to have fun.

Older toddlers can turn pages so pick either board or paperback books. I'm sure you've started to notice your toddler’s personality. He may have a favorite type of book or want to help you decide what to read. Try to keep books around the house in a place where your child can easily reach them so that he can chose what to read. Toddlers love to hear the same story over and over again. That may be tiring for you but it really helps your child learn to enjoy books.

Books that rhyme or have words that repeat are fun because they can help your child memorize the words. He will start saying the story along with you. Or repeat parts of the book he likes best. Your child may have a favorite book or books. Here a mom lets her older toddler pick out the book he wants to read. Be willing to read the same book over and over again. Your child will soon be able to complete sentences and rhymes in those familiar stories.

Your child is adding two to four words per day to his vocabulary. In this scene the mom and her toddler talk about the pictures in the book as they read. Encourage your child to name familiar objects in the book by asking questions like Where's the dog? What is that? Oh what color is that?

Toddlers love routines. Here the mom reads to her toddler during nap time. Try to add books to all of your daily routines like nap time, bath time, potty time, and bedtime. There are many ways you and your family can read and share books with your older toddler. You'll get a new book through Reach Out and Read at every well child checkup until your child is 5 years old. Feel free to remind your pediatrician or nurse practitioner about your Reach Out and Read book. And remember you can read wherever you are at the bus stop, in the park, at the library, even in the waiting room before a doctor’s appointment. Have fun.

Reading with Your Preschooler: Tips from Reach Out and Read

Dr. Haecker: I'm Dr. Trude Haecker, a pediatrician at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia where we have a very special program called Reach Out and Read to help children and parents discover the joy of reading together.

This short video will help you pick out books and find ways to read with your preschooler who is between 3 and 5 years of age. The goal is for you and your child to have fun. Here a dad encourages his child to talk about what happens or what she thinks might happen in the book.

Little Girl: Why does he have hair in his eyes?

Dr. Haecker: Ask your child to tell the story by asking questions like what happens next? What do you think is happening?

Dad: What's in the bag?

Dr. Haecker: Preschoolers can now recognize letters and numbers and are beginning to notice rhyme. Here the dad encourages his child to identify letters and numbers and to point out words and pictures that begin with the same sound. Point out the letters in your child’s name. Preschoolers love to read stories that relate to their life. Here the dad and the child make up stories about the pictures in a book that relates to the child’s own experience such as going to school.

Use the book to introduce your child to school, daycare, or making friends. Encourage your child to write or draw while you read. There are many people in your child’s life who can help with reading. For example, a big sister or brother makes a great reading partner. You'll get a new book through Reach Out and Read at every well child checkup until your child is 5 years old. Feel free to remind your pediatrician or nurse practitioner about your Reach Out and Read book.

Now is a good time to join the public library. Go to your local library branch and ask for a library card. Many public libraries have special story time sessions that you and your child can enjoy. Your child’s school may also have books that you can borrow. And remember you can read wherever you are; at the bus stop, in the park, at the library, even in the waiting room before a doctor’s appointment. Have fun.

Related Centers and Programs: Reach Out and Read