Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroinflammatory Disorders Clinic

The Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Neuroinflammatory Disorders Clinic at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) offers cutting-edge, multidisciplinary diagnosis and clinical care for children with multiple sclerosis and other neuroinflammatory disorders. The clinic is led by world-renowned experts in MS and related disorders, and is recognized as a Partner in MS Care – Center for Comprehensive Care by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Here at CHOP, your child will have access to a dedicated team of highly-trained child neurologists, MS-certified nurses, and therapists. As part of the CHOP-PENN Age-Span NeuroImmune Program, our clinic is designed to support your child’s needs from the time of diagnosis until the time they transition to adult care. At every stage, we’re seeking ways to improve treatment options for MS and other pediatric neuroinflammatory disorders. Our team is internationally known for research discoveries surrounding the causes, immune features, treatment and clinical outcomes of these disorders.

Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis as a Teen: Hannah's Story

Conditions We Treat

If your child has been diagnosed with or has symptoms of any neuroinflammatory or demyelinating disease, please contact us — we are here to help. In addition to the list below, we treat many more conditions, including anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis (NMDARE), anti-MOG related disease, autoimmune encephalitis, cerebral vasculitis (CNS vasculitis), neuromyelitis optica (NMO),opsoclonus myoclonus (OMAS), transverse myelitis, and more.

Our Team

Our core team includes neurologists and nurses who specialize in caring for children with multiple sclerosis and neuroinflammatory disorders. Your child may also see occupational therapists, physical therapists, a social worker, and other specialists as needed.


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